Archives for October 2006

Arts and Crafts Accessories – Table Top Linens

Over the years we have had many opportunities and requests from customers, artisans, and craftsmen to add various arts and crafts furnishings and accessories to our product inventory.  Until recently, we just hadn’t come across the right craftsman style furnishings or accessories that we felt would have wide appeal to our relatively focused customer base.   

However, we are pleased to say that we are starting to carry a line of arts and crafts embroidered table top linens. The table top linens are an ideal decorative accessory to go with a wide variety of art pottery bowls, vases, and tiles. The classic craftsmen colors of the linens are the perfect complement to most arts and crafts furniture and interiors. 

We are starting with a limited supply of five table top embroidered linen patterns which can be seen below.  Custom orders are a possibility so if you are looking for something to complement a collection of a particular pattern of Roseville, matte green pottery, etc let us know.

Greg Myroth – Not Just Art Pottery Anymore!

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American Beauty Table Top Linen

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Blue Diamond Table Top Linen

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Ginkgo Round Table Top Linen

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Thorny Rose Table Top Linen – Burgundy

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Thorny Rose Table Top Linen – Orange

 

Interior Redesign

If you are decorating challenged like me or just struggle with the best way to display your antiques or collectibles, this article on services provided by interior redesigners might be just what you are looking for.  The article discusses services provided by interior designers who focus on decorating by rearranging your existing furniture, art, and accessories. 

Marie Kinnaman of interior-redesign-exchange.com states in the article "Before you spend a dime on anything new, I say let’s do the very best with what you have."  In addition to coordinating the website, Ms. Knnaman was also an early guest on the HGTV series "Decorating Cents."

The article recommends the following websites for additional interior decorating tips and resources:

Greg Myroth – Decorate with Art Pottery

Van Briggle Pottery Fake Marks

Another Van Briggle Pottery fake mark has recently surfaced on eBay.  So far, many of the Van Briggle fakes have early, dated marks on the bottom of the vase. Most of the reproductions are vases, bowl, and tea pots that are obviously not original Van Briggle forms so they are readily identifiable as fakes by most pottery collectors.  An example of one of the fake marks is shown below.  Here is a link to a summary including photos and normal bottom marks and clay color of early Van Briggle pottery.Van_briggle_fake1_1

Greg Myroth

Buying and Selling ORIGINAL Van Briggle Pottery!

University of North Dakota Pottery History

The Ceramics Department at the University of North Dakota School of Mines (UND) produced art pottery between 1910 and 1949. The University established the Ceramics Department at the urging of Earle Babcock. The department hired Margaret Cable from the Pottery Shop of the Handicraft Guild in Minneapolis to be the instructor in 1910. Pict2677

Hildegarde Fried joined the UND Ceramics Department in 1918. Other recognized names at the University include Julia Mattson who was hired in 1924 as an art pottery instructor. Margaret Cable’s sister Flora Cable Huckfield also came to work at UND in 1924.

Julia Mattson and Margaret Cable are probably the most sought-after artists associated with UND art pottery. Ms. Cable and her sister Flora Cable Huckfield left the University of North Dakota School of Mines in 1949 and both passed away in 1960. Julia Mattson left the Ceramics Department in 1963 and passed away in 1967.

The most highly regarded examples of North Dakota School of Mines art pottery include the vases and bowls decorated with sgaffito designs of western scenes including cowboys, cowgirls, buffalo, oxen, covered wagons, etc.

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Sources for additional information on UND art pottery:

 

 

Greg Myroth

Showcase Your Pottery, Art, or Antique Collection

There is a new, free website, Squirl, which provides collectors an on line venue to showcase, inventory, or catalog their collectibles, art, and antiques of any kind and quantity.  The website is following the latest popular Internet trend of social networking websites.  Squirl offers many templates for different categories of antiques and collectibles and you can make your collection on the site private.  You can also do batch uploading of images.

There are features in place to allow messaging and commenting which can help you make connections and stay in contact with like-minded collectors.  It will be interesting to see if this site takes off and becomes a storehouse for collectors to inventory that art pottery or arts and crafts collection. 

Greg Myroth – Collecting Way Too Many Pots!

Dating Newcomb Pottery, Photos

As a followup to yesterday’s Newcomb Pottery post, the photos below provide visual examples of various date marks. Dsc9616

BY39 corresponds with a Newcomb pottery production date of 1907.

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ES26 corresponds with a Newcomb pottery date of production of 1912.

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HA80 corresponds with a date of production of 1914.

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IC25 corresponds with a date of production of 1916.

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KY61 corresponds with a date of production of 1920.

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SA67 corresponds with a Newcomb pottery date of production of 1929.

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Below is an example of the rarely seen Newcomb Pottery paper label.  The NL85 date code indicates a 1923 date of production.

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Shop for Newcomb Pottery

Greg Myroth

Newcomb College Pottery Marks

Dsc0528_1 Newcomb pottery produced between 1901 to 1942 was marked with its own unique registration mark which provides easy dating of the pottery.  The unique registration system was fully deciphered by Walter Bob after over 2 years of extensive research.  The Newcomb dating system in its entirely can be seen in Newcomb Pottery & Crafts An Educational Enterprise for Women 1895-1940 by Jessie Poesch with Sally Main.

The registration mark on each piece of Newcomb pottery consists of a letter, or letter combination, and number (between 1 and 100).  For each letter designation 100 numbered pieces were produced.  Once you know the production year for the registration marks, it becomes quite easy to date Newcomb pottery.   The registration numbers can be found either stamped, incised, or painted on the bottom of the pottery. 

The following table summarizes the registration numbers by year for Newcomb pottery.

  • 1901 – A through F  (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter)
  • 1902 -G through W (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter)
  • 1903 – X through Z then AA, BB, etc. to NN (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter and letter combination)
  • 1904 – OO through ZZ then AA, AB, etc. through AE (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1905 – AF through AU (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1906 – AV through AZ then BA through BL (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1907 – BM through CC (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1908 – CD through CT (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1909 – CU through DL (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1910 – DM through ED (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1911- EF through EW (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1912 – EX through FP (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1913 – FQ through GI (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1914 -GJ through HA (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1915 – HB through HT (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1916 – HS through IM (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1917 – IN through JF (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1918 – JG through JX (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1919 – JY through KQ (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1920 – KR through LI (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1921 – LJ through MC (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1922 – MD through MW (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1923 – MX through NQ (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1924 – NR through OJ (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1925 – OK through PD (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1926 – PE through PX (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1927 – PY through QP (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1928 – QR through RI (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1929 – RJ through SA (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1930 – SB through SR (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1931 – ST through TK (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1932 – TL through UC (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1933 – UD through UT (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1934 – UV through VM (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1935 – VN through WE (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1936 – WF through WV (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1937 – WX through XP (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1938 – XQ through YG (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1939 – YH through YX (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1940 – YZ through ZQ (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter combination)
  • 1941 – ZR through ZY (1-100 numbered pieces for each letter)

Greg Myroth – Buying and Selling Newcomb Pottery

Paypal Tips and Phone Number

As most everyone knows, PayPal is the largest and fastest growing online payment service.  The company has grown from its beginning days as method of making payments for eBay auctions via email to an acceptable payment method for many retail websites including such recognized names as Dell, iTunes, and Walgreens. 

A recent Wall Street Journal article offered a couple of tips which I thought were beneficial for both new and experienced paypal users as noted below.

1.  Unless you are familiar with your merchant, PayPal users should strongly consider using the credit card option for paying for purchases. It is important to note that if you give paypal your bank account information, the service will default to pulling money out of your bank account rather than charging your credit card.   While PayPal offers some level of buyer protection, it is a much more difficult process to obtain a refund through Paypal than simply disputing the charge through your credit card company.

2.   Rather than funding your PayPal account through your checking account consider using a debit card instead of your bank.

3.  Never click on any link in an email that purports to be from PayPal.  Always go directly to PayPal’s home page to access your account.

4.  Finally, I bet you didn’t know PayPal has a toll free number that’s worth writing down for future reference:  800-854-1366.

Greg Myroth

Fulper Pottery Marks

Fulper produced art pottery from around 1900 to 1935.  A variety of marks were used by the company throughout its years of prodution.  The following provides examples of many of these marks as well as the approximate periods of use.Dsc9387

Large Fulper Rectangular Ink Mark

This mark was used from around 1909 until 1916. Two examples of this mark have been documented one with serif font the other without. 

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Fulper Vasecraft Paper Label

Some examples of Fulper Pottery produced between 1909 and 1916 were marked with this paper label.  As shown the label typically has the form name and glaze.

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Prang Rectangular Ink Mark

Between around 1913 and 1929 the Prang Art Supply Company sold Fulper Pottery.  Between 1913 and 1916 examples of Fulper Pottery sold by Prang were marked with the following mark.  After 1916, Fulper pottery sold by Prang was marked with the later Fulper stamp.

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Raised Oval Fulper Mark

From around 1916 to 1922, Fulper used the following raised vertical trademarks.

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Incised Fulper Mark

From around 1916 to approximately 1922, Fulper pottery used a incised stamp mark as noted below.  This mark is often found on some of Fulper’s better examples.

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Oval Fulper Ink-Stamp Vertical Mark

From approximately 1922 to 1928, Fulper used the following ink stamp mark.  This mark is sometimes referred to as the "oval racetrack" mark by some collectors.

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Later Fulper Stamp Mark

After 1928 until the end of art pottery production in 1935, Fulper pottery used a horizontal, impressed mark.  Typically the mark is accompanied with the shape number of the vase.

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Other Fulper Pottery Marks

Fulper used a few other marks during its middle period of production.  Examples include the Rafco mark and the Flemington stamp.

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Additional Fulper Pottery Resources:

Greg Myroth

Zanesville Pottery Lovers Reunion 2007

Mark your calenders for the 2007 Pottery Lovers Reunion in Zanesville, Ohio.   The 2007 Zanesville Pottery Lovers event runs from July 16th through July 21st.  The following is a schedule of pottery events going on during the week:

  • Room sales in area hotels:  July 16-18, 2007
  • Mixer party, show and tell (the theme will be "Your Prized Possession"): July 17, 2007
  • Pottery Lovers Banquet: July 18, 2007
  • Pottery Lovers Auction: July 19, 2007
  • Pottery Lovers 25th Anniversary Show and Sale: July 20-21, 2007

More information on the Pottery Lovers Reunion can be found at www.potterylovers.org.

Greg Myroth