Archives for September 2012

Looking for an American Pottery Sale?

It’s not often we do a post on our sale page, but there are some incredible finds that are definitely must see. And here’s a hint: there’s even a few Roseville Pottery rare finds on sale. Take a look –

Of course, the first thing I’m dying to talk about is the Brush McCoy Pottery Majolica Brown Amaryllis Vase. This spectacular find is stunning. It’s in factory original condition with a small stilt chip in the vase. The vase measures 4 1/4″ tall and 2 3/4″ wide.  Also – and this is exciting – there’s also a matching vase if you would like a pair. Note the deep, rich blue and brown hues. It truly is a beautiful work of art.

The Roseville Pottery Primrose Pink Flower Frog is a unique choice and makes a great addition to your collection. With lovely hues that coordinate flawlessly, this flower frog brings the unmistakeable Roseville Pottery flair and attention to detail. It has the traditional Roseville marking and the number 22 on the underside. It’s in excellent condition with a small nick on the underside. It’s visible only when you turn the frog over. It measures 4 3/4″ high and 3 1/4″ wide.

Another exciting find is the Roseville Pottery Vista vase. This beautiful creation is also in mint condition. It’s a massive 18 inches in height and 8 inches wide – think about how this would look in the middle of your holiday table. It definitely demands to be noticed. The raised artistic efforts add texture to an already striking appearance. Imagine those hues of blue and gold and green in your Thanksgiving presentation!

Of course, the sale items rotate pretty quickly, and these aren’t the only two sale items. Visit our Sale page regularly to get the best deals on those pieces your own collection is missing. Also, as we prepare to head into the new year, if you haven’t already liked our Just Art Pottery and our Just Art Pottery Roseville pages, now’s a great time to do so. We love the interactions and it’s also where you get the latest news on what’s going on.

Holiday Decor: Roseville Bushberry, Roseville Clemantis

It’s that time of year again – and for many of us, it’s what makes the rest of the year worth the wait. Maybe that’s a bit dramatic, but still, it really is an exciting time for American art pottery collectors. For me, it’s the perfect time to beautifully include my art pottery into my holiday decor. With my niece, who’s now shown an interest in what I love so dearly, it’s certainly that much more special. While I don’t have an entire collection of any Roseville pattern, I do adore each piece I do own – it all has a story.

This year, I’ve already decided on what I’ll be using as my centerpiece for both Thanksgiving and Christmas. If you’re into “holiday mode”, and wondering what you can do this year to add to the seasonal beauty, check out a few of my personal favorites – they may become yours too.

Roseville Bushberry

This glorious pattern is considered late period, as it made its debut in 1941. With the primary colors of blue, green and orange, they provide that rich color combination that’s perfect for the holidays. There remains some debate, friendly debate, mind you – but debate nonetheless on how many shapes were included. The advertisements of the day tout 64; however, the factory stock pages only show 61. With a growing movement that makes the Roseville Bushberry pattern more valuable, it’s finding a new popularity – which is quite impressive considering it’s already a favorite among many Roseville collectors.

While some people don’t believe in making their Roseville pottery into useful vessels on their dinner tables, it’s just too hard for me to resist. While I would never put food in any of my pottery, I do like using the Roseville Pottery Bushberry Blue Bowl, which you can see here, for little non-food uses. Think toothpicks or even individually wrapped mints. Tip: Try to keep them out of reach of little hands – but understand if you’re a lone pottery lover, your guests may not understand your efforts of keeping them out of little hands.

Roseville Clemantis

Roseville Clemantis is another beautiful choice for the holidays. It too is considered a late period pattern and was released just three years after Bushberry. It’s the rich brown, blue and green color combinations that make this one a great choice – plus the red flowers remind you of Chrysanthemums, which, of course, is the traditional flower for Christmas. These are beautiful choices for holding dried flowers and make a spectacular centerpiece. Tip: I wouldn’t encourage (in fact, I discourage) adding live flowers which will require water in the vessel. It’s just a safety precaution I take.

There are several vases in this pattern – which is why they make great centerpieces. Consider adding matching dinner napkins (I use gold because of the centers in the flowers on my vases).

Of course, these are just a few ideas. Are you considering incorporating your Roseville Pottery? We’d love to hear about it! Leave us a comment or visit our Facebook page and our Just Art Pottery Roseville Pottery Facebook page. Photos are always great, too!

 

An Update on George E. Ohr Museum

It’s been awhile since we checked in on the progress of the George E. Ohr Museum in Biloxi, MS. As many know, there had been a significant amount of construction completed on the new building when Hurricane Katrina slammed the coast in 2005. There was nothing left. With Hurricane Isaac in the news this past week and with its landfall along the same area as Katrina, we were wondering how the museum was preparing and how the project as a whole was moving on.

George Ohr, also known as the Mad Potter of Biloxi, was eccentric in the way he lived and the way he created his art. I recently spoke with someone who is quite familiar with the legacy Ohr left behind, and while it’s not surprising, it was interesting to learn a bit more about the artist. One look at any of the available photos of him would surely have anyone think he was a bit…grumpy. Or as they say down here in the south, “an ol’ buzzard”. Of course, that’s not an insult, in fact, like many artists, he likely took pride in knowing others understood his eccentricities, no matter which adjectives were used. And it’s good for us because of the spectacular artistic bodies he left behind. Each piece is powerful, mature and quite influential, too.

Ohr died in 1918, and it wasn’t until the mid 1960s that the vast majority of his work was located. Much of it is at home in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, but there’s even more that defines the permanent collections in the Ohr O’Keefe Museum of Art.

The masterpiece – and truly, that’s the only way to describe it – is right at home among the massive Antebellum homes that remain after two massive hurricanes, Camille in 1969 and, of course, Katrina in 2005. With its ultra contemporary lines and interesting dimensions, it would do Ohr proud if he could see it now. There are many exhibits that rotate year round and there are also several different areas within the museum. While the many photos on the website are spectacular, you haven’t “felt” the art until you’re standing in the middle of the museum with the salt air coming in on the Gulf of Mexico. It’s an experience, no doubt.

Currently, there are three exhibits being shown and three permanent exhibits; including, of course, many of the beautiful American art pottery pieces created by none other than the Mad Potter. If you’ve not seen the website recently, now’s a great time since the directors have added much more to it. And if you’re along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, be sure and save an afternoon for this beautiful museum – it’s time well spent.

And if you plan on going or have your own art pottery story, we’d love to hear it. Be sure to let us know on our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter, too.