The Vast Roseville Futura Art Deco Line

What’s not to love about what is arguably the most versatile Roseville Pottery pattern.  Roseville Futura is all about the art deco style, complete with sharp lines, dimension and extraordinary color choices. Considered a middle period line, Futura was introduced in 1928 and really put Roseville  in a new light.

Remember, both Roseville Carnelian and Roseville Rosecraft were introduced just two years earlier. While both of these arts and crafts patterns have their own draw and remain popular with collectors today, they also seemed to set the stage for what was coming. Rosecraft’s primary colors were brown and green and had only 10 shapes. Meanwhile, Carnelian didn’t sell well and the majority of any unsold pieces were pulled and re-glazed as the Carnelian II pattern.

And then the curtain was raised for Roseville Futura

Roseville Pottery Futura Spittoon Vase 403-7

. Think of a color – any color – Futura offers it. No “one-hue color” with this line, you’re bound to find those deeper greens that are stunning under a heavy gloss, those moss greens that are ideal for detailing and it’s the same with all of the colors.

There are 78 Futura shapes and most are marked with paper labels (don’t forget, those paper labels are likely to have been lost through the years, which means many would be unmarked) with a few that offer hand written shape numbers.

Futura made impressive strides in its heyday and the potential was there for a long run, but like all things in the late 1920s, what “was before” rarely “was after” the stock market crash. Futura was dealt an unfair fate. Even after some recovery, the mindsets of people were raw with all too vivid memories of poverty, hunger and fear. The collective priority of a nation shifted. For many collectors who own any Futura pieces, there’s a certain realization. These pieces were likely made by artists who were confident in the future and purchased by consumers who weren’t yet worried about the possibility of what lied ahead. Regardless of the motivation for collectors, there’s such beauty and detailing to every piece from the Roseville Futura Line.

Here’s a list of all Roseville Futura pieces:

Bowl   

187-8 tan            Balloons Bowl

187-8 gray         Balloons Bowl

188-8 tan            Aztec Bowl

188-8 gray         Aztec Bowl

189-4                   Sand Toy

190-3                   Blue Box

191-8                    Square Box

194-5                   Little Flying Saucer or “Ashtray”

195-10                 Flying Saucer

196-12 tan          Sailboat

196 12 gray        Sailboat

197-6                    Half Egg

198-5                    Hibachi

Candle Holder, pr     

1072-4                Aztec Ladies

1073-4                Candlesticks with Leaves

1075-4                Flying Saucer Candlesticks

Flower Frog   

15-2.5                  Little Round Frog

15-3.5                  Big Round Frog

Hanging Basket         

344-5 tan           Little Hanging Basket

344-5 gray        Little Hanging Basket

344-6 tan           Big Hanging Basket

344-6 gray        Big Hanging Basket

Jardiniere      

616-6 tan            Jardiniere

616-6 gray         Jardiniere

616-7 tan            Jardiniere

616-7 gray         Jardiniere

616-8 tan            Jardiniere

616-8 gray         Jardiniere

616-9 tan            Jardiniere

616-10 tan         Jardiniere

616-10 gray      Jardiniere & Pedestal

Planter           

81-5                      Blue Sunray

82-6                      Blue Fan

85-4                      2 Pole Pink Pillow Vase

Vase   

Roseville Pottery Futura Space Capsule Vase 432-10

380-6                   Torch

381-6                    Beer Mug

382-7                    Telescope

383-8                    Little Blue Triangle

384-8                    Ball Bottle

385-8                    Pleated Star

386-8 pink          Jukebox

386-8 brns          Jukebox

387-7 gray          Bamboo Leaf Ball

387-7 blue          Bamboo Leaf Ball

388-9                    Big Blue Triangle

389-9                    Emerald Urn

390-10 org Bud Christmas Tree

390-10 blu Bud Christmas Tree

391-10                  Black Flame

392-10                  Shooting Star

393-12                  Four Ball Vase

394-12                  Bomb

395-10                  Stepped Urn

396-5                     Chalice

Roseville Pottery Futura Four Ball Vase 393-12

397-6                     Square Cone

398-6                     Green Twist

399-7                     Red Vee

400-7 tan            Ostrich Egg

400-7 p&g          Ostrich Egg

401-8                    Cone

402-8                    Milk Carton

403-7                    Spittoon

404-8 blue          Balloons Globe

404-8 grn            Balloons Globe

405-7                    Spaceship

406-8                    Beehive

407-9                    Green Fan

408-10                 Seagull

409-9                    Football Urn

410-12                  Table Leg

411-14                  Arches

412-9                    Tank

421-5                    Brown Stump

422-6                    Two Pole Bud Vase

423-6                    Tombstone

424-7                    Stepped Egg

425-8                    Hexagon Twist

426-8                    Winged Vase

427-8                    Mauve Thistle

428-8                    Egg with Leaves

429-9                    Purple Crocus

430-9                    Chinese Pillow

431-10                  Falling Bullet

432-10                  Space Capsule

433-10                  Pine Cone

434-10                  Michelin Man

435-10                  Elephant Leg

436-12                  Chinese Bronze

437-12                  Weeping Tulip

438-15                  Tall Teasel

Wall Pocket   

1261-8 tan           Wall Pocket

1261-8 gra           Wall Pocket

Window Box 

376-15                  Window Box

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Roseville Creamware

Ah – the Roseville Creamware line. This is definitely one of those collections that you’ll spend your life searching for because you’re so drawn to it or it will be one you’ll steer clear of – love it or strongly dislike it.

Roseville Pottery Creamware

Maybe one of the reasons this is, first, one of the more versatile Roseville design lines, but more importantly, not a favorite among some collectors is because of the decals. Some thought they were being shortchanged with this collection, but once you consider the times, it becomes clear as to why the pottery company incorporated these less-expensive decals. Production costs were always in the forefront and consumers were watching their funds closely.

There often wasn’t enough in the budget for decorative pieces and when there were, it had better be an affordable venture, or the consumer of the day would walk right on by. This, coupled with the end of the so-called Arts & Crafts era, proved to be a challenge for the art industry as a whole and certainly those in art pottery.

In the early 1900s, the Roseville Creamware was unveiled, complete with its decals. There were floral patterns, people – sometimes animated, messaging (several fraternal societies used Creamware for coffee mugs, complete with the frat’s branding – and an extensive line called Juvenile.

If you can get past the absence of bold artistic efforts and rich color hues, Creamware really is a lovely collection; unfortunately, anyone who agrees often does so as an afterthought. It’s just not one of those lines that catch your eye. Then there are those that just look misplaced.

There is a rather interesting design – one of those that look out of place. The Creamware chamber pot throws you for a loop. First, it’s heavily decorated on the outside with “Novelty Steins” – mostly kids. But when you lift the lid, many discover this eye painted in the center of the pot. It’s really remarkable as it looks quite real, much the way a 3-D eye would appear in a more modern setting. Some of those pots also have a message: “Wash me out and keep me clean and I won’t tell what I have seen.”

The Juvenile pieces almost always have decals of children in various ages. Some offer up nursery rhymes as well. Even though it was heavily produced for quite some time, it is considered a valuable line and one that’s highly sought after.

 

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Holiday Decor: Roseville Bushberry, Roseville Clemantis

It’s that time of year again – and for many of us, it’s what makes the rest of the year worth the wait. Maybe that’s a bit dramatic, but still, it really is an exciting time for American art pottery collectors. For me, it’s the perfect time to beautifully include my art pottery into my holiday decor. With my niece, who’s now shown an interest in what I love so dearly, it’s certainly that much more special. While I don’t have an entire collection of any Roseville pattern, I do adore each piece I do own – it all has a story.

This year, I’ve already decided on what I’ll be using as my centerpiece for both Thanksgiving and Christmas. If you’re into “holiday mode”, and wondering what you can do this year to add to the seasonal beauty, check out a few of my personal favorites – they may become yours too.

Roseville Bushberry

This glorious pattern is considered late period, as it made its debut in 1941. With the primary colors of blue, green and orange, they provide that rich color combination that’s perfect for the holidays. There remains some debate, friendly debate, mind you – but debate nonetheless on how many shapes were included. The advertisements of the day tout 64; however, the factory stock pages only show 61. With a growing movement that makes the Roseville Bushberry pattern more valuable, it’s finding a new popularity – which is quite impressive considering it’s already a favorite among many Roseville collectors.

While some people don’t believe in making their Roseville pottery into useful vessels on their dinner tables, it’s just too hard for me to resist. While I would never put food in any of my pottery, I do like using the Roseville Pottery Bushberry Blue Bowl, which you can see here, for little non-food uses. Think toothpicks or even individually wrapped mints. Tip: Try to keep them out of reach of little hands – but understand if you’re a lone pottery lover, your guests may not understand your efforts of keeping them out of little hands.

Roseville Clemantis

Roseville Clemantis is another beautiful choice for the holidays. It too is considered a late period pattern and was released just three years after Bushberry. It’s the rich brown, blue and green color combinations that make this one a great choice – plus the red flowers remind you of Chrysanthemums, which, of course, is the traditional flower for Christmas. These are beautiful choices for holding dried flowers and make a spectacular centerpiece. Tip: I wouldn’t encourage (in fact, I discourage) adding live flowers which will require water in the vessel. It’s just a safety precaution I take.

There are several vases in this pattern – which is why they make great centerpieces. Consider adding matching dinner napkins (I use gold because of the centers in the flowers on my vases).

Of course, these are just a few ideas. Are you considering incorporating your Roseville Pottery? We’d love to hear about it! Leave us a comment or visit our Facebook page and our Just Art Pottery Roseville Pottery Facebook page. Photos are always great, too!

 

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Passing on the Roseville Pottery Appreciation

I never thought I’d look at people younger than me and think of them in terms of the “younger generation”. That’s what

Roseville Azurean

grandparents do! But, after hanging out with my best friend’s sixteen year-old daughter this weekend, I’m beginning to differentiate the generations.

After getting completely flustered with only half of her attention for the most part of the afternoon (those pesky cells and their texting features!), I finally said, “OK, sunshine…here’s what we’re going to do. Put that phone away and let me show you a few things that you just might appreciate one day.” Of course, that was met with a roll of the eyes and a reluctant and rather drawn out “OK”.

I pointed to a few pieces of my favorite Roseville Pottery patterns. “What do you see, Sam?” After a pause, she said, “I don’t know. A bowl with a bunch of holes in the top of it.” Taking a deep breath and resisting the urge to roll my own eyes, I began explaining to her what a flower frog is. I explained how they’ve traditionally been used to hold flower arrangements in place. Before long, I had her attention and began telling her different “Roseville stories”.

I showed her a few wall pockets I have arranged on my living room wall. She asked what purpose they served. I think her exact words were, “Yeah, it’s pretty. But what does it do?” She’s a lovely girl who appreciates lovely jewelry, so I used that to my benefit. I said, “Wouldn’t this be pretty hanging on the wall just above your jewelry box to hold the rings you wear every day?” She particularly liked the Roseville Freesia.

From there, we moved on the different glazes and beveling efforts that really set Roseville apart. I explained to her what a jardiniere and pedestal were and before long we were on the Just Art Pottery website going over window boxes, vases and candle holders.

Two hours later, she had sweet talked me out of one of my favorite wall pockets and had an understanding of the importance of American art pottery. I wasn’t the least bit surprised when she announced Roseville Azurean is her new favorite. That kid loves blue. Her bedroom is blue, blue is the primary color of the high school she attends and I have a strong sense that I’m going to be investing in pieces from this beautiful line for birthdays and Christmas – and I couldn’t be happier.

What was most important, though, is I started out with a typical teen who could care less about a flower frog and by the time it was over, texting was the last thing on her mind and she walked away with the seed planted and a new appreciation for art – specifically, Roseville pottery. Will this be an everyday thing with her? Of course not. What I hope, though, is that it will encourage her to broaden her horizons, develop her own passion for the real beauty in the world and hopefully, serve as something that she equates to time spent with me when she’s older.

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Roseville Pottery Trivia

Think you know everything there is to know about Roseville Pottery? It’s often the details that get lost in our minds. For instance, did you know Roseville Pottery’s first line was Rozane? And did you know it was developed to keep pace with two competing lines, Weller’s Louwelsa and Owen Pottery’s Utopian?

Roseville Pottery, based out of Zanesville, Ohio, had to compete with at least twelve more American art potteries within Zanesville. Still, its business model, ability to recruit some of the best known artists and commitment to quality was the driving force behind its reputation.

Roseville Pottery’s incorporation papers were filed in Zanesville on January 4, 1892. Among those signing them were J.F. Weaver, Thomas Brown, G. Young, Charles Allison and L Kildow. A depression during the 1890s resulted in Roseville Pottery being forced out of business.

As it was seeking to regroup, the company decided to put its wares in A&P grocery stores – it proved quite successful, too.

These days, we’re accustomed to marketing efforts by companies via Facebook and email. While technological opportunities didn’t exist during Roseville Pottery’s heyday, it did have a familiar marketing plan. A brochure from 1905 offered customers a free Rozane paperweight that would be a part of a customer’s first shipment – but only if the customer provided at least three names of friends, neighbors and family members. There is one interesting statement in this particular ad that states the company only wanted those prospects “whose purses might permit them to purchase Rozane”. That’s not common in today’s contemporary ads. We never hear a salesman say, “Give me the names of those whose credit can pass”.

Sometimes, a trip down memory lane is all that’s needed to remind us why we appreciate the beautiful American art pottery that was so carefully created more than one one hundred years ago. With the rich history serving as the foundation, Roseville Pottery provides a truly inspirational story.

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Roseville Art Pottery Wall Pockets

There is something so striking about a collection of American art pottery wall pockets. Take it a step further and make it a collection of Roseville Pottery wall pockets, and you have a beautiful – and rare – collection. Many of us don’t have a six, eight or more Roseville wall pockets, but there’s no doubt these treasures are not likely to leave the family. If you’re like me, these get written into the will!

What makes Roseville Pottery wall pockets so different has a lot to do with the versatility of these creations. The glaze lines, shapes, textures and a host of other creative efforts come together to form the perfect wall decor. The fact that many of the lines with Roseville Pottery include a wall pocket sweetens the deal even more.

Roseville Snowberry

One of the really popular lines, Roseville Pottery Snowberry, has its own wall pocket. It incorporates interesting straight lines and even has small handles. The beveled florals along with the way the browns, pinks and greens play off each other, makes this a definite must-have if you ever come across one. The good news is it’s a fairly affordable piece. These beauties measure 5 1/4″ in height and are 8″ wide.

Roseville Poppy Gray

Another favorite, at least of this writer, is the Roseville Pottery Poppy Gray wall pocket. I love this one because of the way the artists extend it with two miniature pockets on either side. Another eye-catching inclusion is the lovely pale yellow and light blue-gray glaze combination. It’s the perfect frame for the white poppy pair that defines this wall vase.

Roseville Freesia Green

For those who appreciate the more dramatic side of Roseville Pottery, the Freesia Green is definitely worth a bit of time searching out. The soft black allows the matte green glaze to jump out, even as what appears to be very light pink dandelions are gracing center stage. It too offers dual handles and is sure to the centerpiece of any Roseville Pottery wall pocket collection. The design has a wide opening at the top and flows downward to a soft point at its base.

These are just a few of the wall pockets that are part of the Roseville name. If you have a collection, we’d love to see your photos. We’re always inspired by other Roseville Pottery fans.

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Roseville Pottery Orian

The middle period line that’s all about vivid colors and a rich gloss glaze is Roseville’s Orian; curiously, it’s also one that’s often overlooked. Considered art deco, this contemporary collection offers those vibrant colors this time period is known for and certainly presents the willingness to take a risk that Roseville Pottery was known to do.

In the mid-1930s, during the height of its popularity, it was referred to as a “solid color line that is a real achievement in ceramic art…inspired directly or indirectly by the Chinese vases of the Ming period”. It was also noted for the unique contours and glaze combinations. It’s interesting, too, that while trying to grasp the right adjectives for this post, I ran across an apt description related to the designs: “shapes are lovely but in no way extreme”. That’s true, too – they’re unique and and certainly creative, but we’re not talking on the level, of say, the aggressive designs George Ohr was known for. The result is a fun presentation of narrow handles, wider vases and pedestal bases – lots of pedestal bases.

It’s believed there were sixteen shapes with this Roseville pattern – and they’re all beautiful choices. If you run across them, and if you’re an art deco fan, odds are, it’s going to be difficult to pass up. There are several vases in a wide range of heights, widths and glaze colors, along with bowls, candlesticks, wall pockets and even a lovely rose bowl.

You’ll recognize the Roseville Orian. Look for the glossy finish, smart color combinations (one favorite is the yellow and green that really makes the vases stand out). Also, those narrow and usually low resting dual handles are generally a giveaway along with the classic “pedestal base”. While there are several tan pieces, they’re not likely to sell for as much as their more colorful counterparts. Also, note that in the bowls, the interior of the actual bowl is usually white, which is a nice contrast with the reds, greens and yellows on the outside of the pieces.

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Roseville Pottery Florals: Roseville Sunflower, Water Lily

There are countless patterns, glazes, shapes and color combinations that define the Roseville Pottery as a whole. One of those themes is the creativity and elegance found in those lines of florals. Some are definitive, such as the Roseville Sunflower or Apple Blossom collections and others are a little less obvious, such as those sometimes found in Roseville Crystal Green, which, incidentally, remains difficult to find.

We thought we’d explore two of the more recognized Roseville Pottery lines: the Roseville Water Lily and Roseville Sunflower. There are a few similar features, but for the most part, each is quite distinctive in its own way. For instance, the Roseville Sunflower patter is considered middle period collection, as it was introduced 1930. The Water Lily pattern was unveiled in 1943.

Roseville Sunflower

Easily distinguished by the golds in the sunflowers and often with a green foundation, the Roseville Sunflower pattern is really quite sought after – from the time it was introduced until modern day, it’s often which serves as a striking complement to those vivid oranges and gold in the raised sunflowers.

It enjoyed a surge of popularity in the 1990s, and as a result, its value increased, too. If you’re looking for markings, because paper labels were sometimes used, it might be you come across a Roseville bowl or vase with no marking. There were some that had hand written shape numbers, which can help with identification. Many of the pieces had dual handles, which certainly adds to the overall presentation. A few of the examples of Sunflower pottery include umbrella stands, wall pockets, and of course, bowls and vases.

Roseville Water Lily

As mentioned, Water Lily is one of the newer lines and was introduced in 1943. Its standard colors are brown, blue, and pink, which blend in a beautiful manner. Like Roseville Sunflower, the Water Lilly also has several vases with two handles. Part of the draw to this particular pattern are the unique textures. The florals are raised and the smooth matte finish works to really accentuate the design elements. This Roseville Pottery pattern includes vases, bowls, bookends, ewers, jardinières and others.

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Avoid Buying Fake Roseville Pottery

One major reason people avoid collecting American art pottery is because they fear not being able to differentiate between fakes and true Roseville Pottery.

The truth is, some of the fake Roseville pieces have a sense of authenticity that makes it difficult to tell apart from true Roseville Pottery. Aside from getting your collection appraised (which we always strongly encourage), you may never know for sure. Then again, there are those who see the beauty and would still purchase it, even if it were a fake, so that

Collection of Roseville Baneda

they could display it in their home. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, except you probably paid Roseville Pottery prices for fake Roseville pieces.

For those who find it difficult to tell apart, there are a few tell-tale signs that might clue you in. Keep in mind – this is all very subjective in that what one’s idea of a “dull glaze” might be different than another’s – again, this only reiterates the importance of a professional appraisal.

Take a look at the glaze on your piece; fakes lack a certain depth and without a “clear” look; it can even look dull and flat. Also, the glaze shouldn’t hinder the nuances of clay underneath it.

Take a look at the handles (if applicable). Fake pieces usually have bigger handles in terms of their dimensions. Again, this is subjective, but for those familiar with this line of art pottery, the differences are obvious.

How about the detailing? Authentic Roseville Pottery offers a lot of detail – the vines, florals, etc. The Roseville artists always took pride in their detailing efforts.

There were many Roseville marks through the years; so many that sometimes even collectors question a Roseville marking. There are those with Roseville U.S.A. or wafer marks or ink stamps – the marking often dates your Roseville piece; however, fraudsters will do their best to replicate the markings in order to fool buyers.

So what should you do to keep from being taken? We always tell customers to study their Roseville pieces they know are authentic. Usually, once you know what truly is real, the fakes become easier to identify. It’s also a great way to learn more about the history of this dynamic line of American art pottery.

If you’re looking to have your Roseville Pottery collection (or any other collection) appraised, give us a call. All of our appraisals are done in accordance with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPA). Greg Myroth is a member of the Association of Online Appraisers and abides by the AOA Code of Ethics. For more information, visit our Just Art Pottery appraisal page.

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Incorporate your Roseville Pottery into Holiday Celebrations

Too many times, we find ourselves scrambling to locate the ideal centerpiece for our family gatherings, especially those special Christmas dinners that we want to ensure are absolutely perfect. As we run from florist to florist or department store to department store, we often overlook the beauty that’s already in our homes, courtesy of our American art pottery collections.

If you’re a Roseville Pottery fan, you already know how versatile your collection is and while there’s not definitive Roseville collection designed especially for Christmas, there are choices within the various collections that can really set the tone for your holidays.  The best part is that you don’t necessarily need a traditional red and green Christmas theme (although there are a few choices that match those color themes). A beautiful Roseville vase with hues of winter white or evergreen works well with silk Chrysanthemums or other holiday floral choices.

As mentioned, there are a few Roseville Pottery pieces that do have a more traditional Christmas theme. The Roseville Creamware collection offers holly-inspired designs. There’s a unique side-pour pitcher with vivid reds and greens against an off-white base. This would make a remarkable centerpiece with the right floral arrangement. Allow the colors to play off each other and you’re sure to have a finished look that’s nothing short of inspirational. Also in this line is a fern dish. This is another beautiful choice, partly because of its footed design. It adds a bit of height, too, which is what most of us like in our centerpieces. If you don’t already own any of these pieces, keep your eyes open – you never know when you’ll come across this particular Roseville design and once you do, it’s sure to be a new addition to your collection.

Another unlikely, though elegant choice for Christmas is found in the Roseville Corinthian line. Granted, it’s probably not the first thing you think of, but the deep green hues in the grooves of the pieces has a certain holiday feel. There are small berries, similar to holly, that coordinate nicely, too. It’s Italian inspired, so you know it’s all about the detailing and this Roseville line doesn’t disappoint.

If you’re not in possession of any of these pieces, remember Roseville Pottery has several lines that incorporate rich reds and brilliant greens. Even those Roseville pieces that don’t have a lot of height can be transformed into the perfect showcase for a bouquet of fresh mistletoe and of course, the other traditional Christmas flowers.

Remember, it’s all about the creativity. The subtle – and even not-so-subtle – Roseville designs makes it easy to allow that creativity to take over.

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