Newcomb College Art Pottery Exhibition

The Columbus Museum recently announced it will be displaying “The Beautiful and Practical: Newcomb College and American Art Pottery” exhibition. It will displayed from now until January 6, 2013. What’s so exciting is there are more than 80 selections of beautiful glazed or otherwise decorated American art pottery. While the “star” of the exhibit will be Newcomb College pottery, there will also be several metalware selections, textiles and other pottery exclusive to Louisiana. In fact, all of the pieces are from Southern collections and many of them are from the Louisiana State University Museum of Art. If you’ve not seen any of these displays before, this is a perfect opportunity if you’re going to be in or near Georgia over the holidays.

A few of those notable art pottery companies that will be represented include Cambridge Pottery, Fulper Pottery, Marblehead, Rookwood Pottery and one of our own favorites, Van Briggle Pottery. You can also expect to see several Weller pottery pieces as well. This is important for the Columbus Museum because it provides a perfect opportunity to show its own proud Newcomb Pottery vase, which was completed by the esteemed master decorator Sabina Wells.

American art pottery, especially those pieces from the turn of the century and even well into the 20th century, are handmade creations, ensuring no two are ever alike. The artists who played such pivotal roles in this amazing sector of American art were always very talented and most certainly in demand. What we’re left with here today is results of their tremendous talents.

While we typically collect art pottery for the beauty of each piece, they were often created to be functional as well. In some instances, the artistry was often a second consideration to the utilitarian purposes. Eventually, though, a shift began that resulted in a focus on the visual appeal. Lucky for us, there are still many collections and pieces for us to enjoy strictly for that visual appeal.

Of course, Newcomb College Pottery was born of a way to provide women in the southern region the opportunity to secure a trade. It was natural their jobs would be created in the arts. A lot has changed, but one thing remains true: women love a beautifully put together home and that was the draw for those seeking to learn more about opportunities in art pottery. Newcomb Pottery was founded in the 1890s at Sophie Newcomb College in New Orleans and remained in business from 1895 to 1940. For many years, it was the only educational facility for these types of trades in the entire southern U.S.

About Columbus Museum:

As an American art and regional history museum, and the second largest general museum in Georgia, the Columbus Museum offers a diverse collection to the public. The Museum houses over 14,000 artifacts and objects that tell the story of the Chattahoochee River Valley’s development, an American fine art collection from a host of renowned American artists, a hands-on gallery for children, the finest traveling exhibitions from across the U.S., and the historic Bradley Olmsted Garden.

For more information about the Columbus Museum or the Newcomb College and American Art Pottery exhibition, please visit www.columbusmuseum.com.

A Loss to the Newcomb Pottery Family

Dr. Jessie J. Poesch, considered one of the most renowned scholars of Newcomb Pottery, passed away April 23, 2011 at the age of 88 in New Orleans. It’s being reported by The Times Picayune that her death was a result of surgery complications. Referring to her as a “scholar blessed with unflagging curiosity”, William Ferris, a long time friend of Dr. Poesch, said “…she pioneered the field of Southern decorative arts”. Those closest to her acknowledge her impressive education and ability to speak easily on any number of topics and quickly say it’s her genuine personality and distinct kindness people will remember most. “Brilliance and personal warmth don’t always go together, but she combined them to a rare degree”.

Dr. Poesch arrived at Tulane in 1963 and was already considered a pioneer and historian of American art and architecture. The Iowan native graduated from Antioch College in Ohio, at which time she began work with the American Friends Service Committee in France and Germany following World War II. Still dedicated to the importance of education, Dr. Poesch, upon her arrival back to the states, then received her M.A. from the University of Delaware, followed by her Ph.D from the University of Pennsylvania.

With her passion for American art pottery, Dr. Poesch made the decision to come south, where she taught History of Art at Newcomb College Art Department, part of Tulane University. It’s said she trained hundreds of students while there and even found time to chair the department between 1972 and 1977. In 1986, she was named to the Maxine and ford Graham Chair. Her official retirement in 1992 lent to an endowed art professorship that was established in her honor that same year.

Those who knew her say retirement was nothing but a word as she continued to move forward in her volunteer and research efforts. Sally Main, an author who collaborated with Dr. Poesch in 2003 as they penned a book on Newcomb Pottery, said, “She had other things to say”. And indeed she did.

Dr. Poesch will continue to live on in the hearts of those who knew and loved her. Her death is a loss to the entire Newcomb Pottery family.

Newcomb Pottery Collection for Sale at Auction

Just Art Pottery Auctions is pleased to have the opportunity to sell a nice five piece collection of Newcomb College pottery that is fresh to the market from an estate collection from

Newcomb Collection for Sale at Auction

Louisiana.  The collection includes three nice vases, a low bowl and a decorative creamer.   The Newcomb pieces are being offered for auction in the sale ending March 6, 2011.  Online bidding is currently available through auctions.justartpottery.com as well as Proxibid.com.

All five pieces are in mint condition without damage or repair and are being sold with no reserve.   The collection offers examples from three of Newcomb’s more recognized decorators including Sadie Irvine, Anna Frances Simpson, and Henrietta Bailey.

Each piece of Newcomb pottery is hand decorated and artist initialed and represents the true sense of the arts and crafts movement.  Most collectors consider Newcomb an investment quality art pottery.

Newcomb Pottery was unofficially started in 1894 when Mary Sheerer was brought from Cincinnati to teach pottery and china decoration at Newcomb College.   The first public exhibition and sale of art pottery produced at the College occurred in 1896.  Over the fifty years the Pottery was in existence over 60,000 hand decorated pieces of Newcomb were produced.

To bid on the Newcomb collection or 150 additional quality pieces of American art pottery go to Auctions.JustArtPottery.com or Proxibid.com.

For more information on Just Art Pottery Auctions, or if you would like to inquire about consignments for upcoming auctions, please visit Auctions.JustArtPottery.com or contact Greg Myroth at greg@justartpottery.com.

Just Art Pottery Auctions

Since 1997, Just Art Pottery has provided collectors of American art pottery with some of the most well known and respected pottery lines in the world, including Roseville Pottery, Van Briggle, Rookwood, Newcomb College, Weller and many more. With the addition of Just Art Pottery Auctions, we have expanded our reach while providing yet another service to the art pottery community. We’re both very excited and quite proud of this project. Because it’s important our name symbolizes ethical business practices, competitive pricing and a wide variety of selections, you can be sure you’ll receive the same service and quality the Just Art Pottery brand is known for.  Whether you’re a new collector or the seasoned professional looking for investment quality art pottery, we invite you to take a look. We’re sure you’ll be as excited as we are.

The Just Art Pottery Auction site provides online bidding, absentee bidding, as well as an option for telephone bidding. Pottery buyers can bid in complete confidence knowing there are no hidden reserve prices and that the condition of each and every piece of pottery is clearly stated in the description and fully guaranteed.

Pottery buyers participating in the current online auction scheduled to close March 6, 2011 will discover one-of-a-kind Roseville Pottery pieces; investment quality examples of Weller and Rookwood pottery; an estate fresh Newcomb Pottery collection from Louisiana; a small collection of contemporary Ephraim Pottery from St. Louis and much more. Interested bidders can register and bid now until March 6, 2011 at Auctions.JustArtPottery.com or Proxibid.com/Justartpottery.

Auctions.JustArtPottery.com has regular live internet based auctions where all sale prices will be determined by competitive bidding by auction participants. Each item up for bid is shown with crisp photographs and the condition descriptions are all-inclusive, complete and fully guaranteed. Most pottery auctions will span between ten and twenty-one days so buyers can browse, bid and buy at their convenience in the comfort of their own homes.

“Online pottery auctions are something we’ve always been drawn to and have incorporated in our business model. Over the years many of our regular customers have asked us for the live, internet auction option on our website to both expand their collections of special pieces of art pottery and also to use as a method to sell their pottery when necessary. The Just Art Pottery Auction site has proven an invaluable tool not only as a service to our existing art pottery customers but also to reach new pottery buyers who are just discovering the rich history and beauty of this line of art”, says Greg Myroth, president and founder of Just Art Pottery.

For more information on the Just Art Pottery Auctions, or if you would like to inquire about consignments for upcoming auctions, please visit Auctions.JustArtPottery.com or contact Greg Myroth at greg@justartpottery.com. And don’t forget to visit our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter, too! After you’ve had a chance to check out the auction site, drop us a line and let us know your thoughts – we love hearing from you.