Archives for November 2012

Teco Pottery

Teco Pottery originally began as Spring Valley Tile Works in Terra Cotta, Illinois in the late 1800s; 1881 to be exact, and was a major player in the Prairie School arts and crafts movement that was later made popular by Frank Lloyd Wright. William Day Gates could often be found experimenting with different clay and glazing combinations, though the company profits came from drain tiles, finials, urns and other materials used to as fireproofing materials. Soon, though, his appreciation of the clay and glaze variations became more prominent and he cleverly named this new branch Teco Pottery – It’s a play on the words “TErra COtta”.

By 1902, Teco Pottery was introduced to the nation and that began a successful effort that resulted in more than 500 designs being released in less than two decades. While we don’t know for sure when the last pieces of Teco Pottery were actually produced, there exists documentation that suggests it continued until at least 1923.

If you’re familiar with Teco Pottery, you know that tell-tale matte green finish. What many aren’t aware of, though, is that it’s part of more than 90% of the entire pottery collection. Some of the pieces have interesting charcoaling, a darker gray, that overlays the green. The combination of these two glazing efforts is truly remarkable. Other colors you’ll find in Teco Pottery are brown, a deep red, pink and blue. Yellow is sometimes found as well. Teco Pottery is one of those collections that the more you display, the more dramatic that presentation is, and a lot of that has to do with the green glazing efforts.

Another unique look that’s part of this American art pottery collection is the abstract designs. There are a lot of clean and defined lines that are both dramatic and effective. To a lesser degree, there are pieces that aren’t as sharp-lined, but it’s most certainly those pieces that have angles that are most sought after. Many people use “architectural” in their descriptions – and that’s accurate too.

For those who love Teco Pottery as much as we do, you owe it to yourself to explore the records that are maintained at the University of Minnesota. Among those records are the original architectural drawings.

Have your own Teco Pottery collection? We’d love to see it! Drop us a line or share them on the Just Art Pottery Facebook page.

Newcomb College Art Pottery Exhibition

The Columbus Museum recently announced it will be displaying “The Beautiful and Practical: Newcomb College and American Art Pottery” exhibition. It will displayed from now until January 6, 2013. What’s so exciting is there are more than 80 selections of beautiful glazed or otherwise decorated American art pottery. While the “star” of the exhibit will be Newcomb College pottery, there will also be several metalware selections, textiles and other pottery exclusive to Louisiana. In fact, all of the pieces are from Southern collections and many of them are from the Louisiana State University Museum of Art. If you’ve not seen any of these displays before, this is a perfect opportunity if you’re going to be in or near Georgia over the holidays.

A few of those notable art pottery companies that will be represented include Cambridge Pottery, Fulper Pottery, Marblehead, Rookwood Pottery and one of our own favorites, Van Briggle Pottery. You can also expect to see several Weller pottery pieces as well. This is important for the Columbus Museum because it provides a perfect opportunity to show its own proud Newcomb Pottery vase, which was completed by the esteemed master decorator Sabina Wells.

American art pottery, especially those pieces from the turn of the century and even well into the 20th century, are handmade creations, ensuring no two are ever alike. The artists who played such pivotal roles in this amazing sector of American art were always very talented and most certainly in demand. What we’re left with here today is results of their tremendous talents.

While we typically collect art pottery for the beauty of each piece, they were often created to be functional as well. In some instances, the artistry was often a second consideration to the utilitarian purposes. Eventually, though, a shift began that resulted in a focus on the visual appeal. Lucky for us, there are still many collections and pieces for us to enjoy strictly for that visual appeal.

Of course, Newcomb College Pottery was born of a way to provide women in the southern region the opportunity to secure a trade. It was natural their jobs would be created in the arts. A lot has changed, but one thing remains true: women love a beautifully put together home and that was the draw for those seeking to learn more about opportunities in art pottery. Newcomb Pottery was founded in the 1890s at Sophie Newcomb College in New Orleans and remained in business from 1895 to 1940. For many years, it was the only educational facility for these types of trades in the entire southern U.S.

About Columbus Museum:

As an American art and regional history museum, and the second largest general museum in Georgia, the Columbus Museum offers a diverse collection to the public. The Museum houses over 14,000 artifacts and objects that tell the story of the Chattahoochee River Valley’s development, an American fine art collection from a host of renowned American artists, a hands-on gallery for children, the finest traveling exhibitions from across the U.S., and the historic Bradley Olmsted Garden.

For more information about the Columbus Museum or the Newcomb College and American Art Pottery exhibition, please visit www.columbusmuseum.com.

Why Sell Your Art Pottery With Just Art Pottery

It may seem like a foreign concept to some collectors, but buying and selling pottery is part of the passion and experience of those who appreciate the beautiful artistic efforts. The artists who really defined the American art pottery movement are many and it makes sense that some of us like to own a bit of each of these artistic efforts. And if you’ve decided to part ways with a few or all of your pieces, whether it’s because you want to focus on a new pattern or wish to experience the excitement that comes with starting a new collection, we would like to invite you to consider selling your collection to Just Art Pottery.

Just Art Pottery has a national base that includes some of the most well known and respected experts in Roseville, Newcomb, Van Briggle and other pottery lines. Our growing clientele has come to rely on Just Art Pottery for ethical business practices and professional relationships with the entire art pottery community.

It’s for these reasons, and more, that Just Art Pottery is a sound choice for turning your collection – regardless of how small or big it is – into a fair profit. We pride ourselves on our relationships with both collectors and buyers and our commitment ensures we are always combing the most unlikely places to bring to our customers those rare pieces. We’re often searching for a specific pottery line or piece for a customer and other times, we are simply searching out those collections that are nothing short of awe-inspiring.

We invite you to contact us if you have any questions or would like to discuss the options available. We are also able to offer nationwide pickup in most instances and we hire only the best shippers to ensure the safety of your investment during transit. We welcome the opportunity to discuss the potential for relationship that will benefit all of us and in some consignment instances, we’re able to provide a cash advance in anticipation of a sale.

Whether it’s one of Just Art Pottery’s auctions or if you’re interested in a more traditional consignment arrangement, we look forward to hearing from you. Give us a call at  (309) 690-7966 or drop us a line for a confidential conversation to discuss your options.

 

Roseville Pottery Candle Holders

Oh, the holidays – we don’t know about you, but we can smell the turkey and dressing and many of us are already studying our Roseville Pottery collections to determine which pieces will grace our holiday meal tables. Candle holders are an absolute necessity around here. In fact, it’s not unusual to choose the tablecloth, dinner ware and yes, even salt and pepper shakers around the Roseville candle sticks. This year, at least at my table, I’ve decided to go full traditional. And that equates to choosing pieces from the Roseville Pottery Pine Cone collection.

If you’ve not seen the double candle holders that are part of the Roseville Pine Cone collection, you’re missing out. There is a set available now that’s in mint condition. They measure 5 inches in height and are 4 1/4 inches wide. Part of the beauty in these candlesticks is found in the double holders on each piece. The deep orange and brown combination, along with the pine cone in the middle of each candle holder are indicative of everything that represents Fall weather. The interior of the holders have a glossy blue finish. This would be lovely on any table, but they just seem especially fitting for Thanksgiving. Also, there are other pieces that are part of this collection that make fine centerpieces, too.

Have you considered Roseville Pottery Freesia as an option? This pattern offers up that deep blue which is a great choice for the holidays. It easily coordinates with other traditional fall colors and the the Freesia Blue candle holders have a nice height – 5 inches, as a matter of fact, that works well with a more formal table setting. The small double loop handles add to the overall beauty, too and the small yellow flowers that adorn the center and base of the holders are an ideal finishing touch.

Finally, there is a lovely set of Roseville Pottery Moss Blue candle holders available now. These aren’t easily located; indeed, this was a rare find. The lighter blue and green combinations are beautiful and the design elements, including a flared out center, will draw attention. Imagine a pair of navy blue taper candles in this set – the sky’s the limit and the colors and hues make it easy to incorporate nearly any color you choose.

These are just a few of our suggestions, of course, but if you do incorporate your Roseville Pottery into your holiday decor, we’d love to see photos!