New Additions of Roseville Patterns Available at Just Art Pottery

It’s always exciting when we add a new arrival from a Roseville Pottery pattern and we’ve recently added several pieces of Roseville in different patterns on our New Arrivals page.

Roseville Baneda bowl

The Roseville Baneda pattern is a favorite among many collectors. It’s the color hues that are remarkable. Even those who prefer the traditional single-color matte finishes often remark on the vivid and bright presentation these color choices bring to this pattern. We have a couple of new Baneda pieces we’ve just added. The Roseville Baneda green vase offers those low resting handles that are always popular. Remember, this pattern was often marked with the foil labels – and this vase has its intact. It’s a lovely piece in mint condition- definitely worth a look.

Our second Baneda new arrival is the classic green jardinière. It’s in excellent condition with no chips, cracks, damage or repairs of any kind. This piece is marked with a red crayon, which is also another popular way of marking these patterns. It’s a nice size, coming in it 4 ¼ inches in height and at its widest, it measures 5 ¾ inches.

And speaking of those vivid color schemes, we also just added a Roseville Wisteria tan bowl as well as a Wisteria tan vase. The greens, purples and yellows in varying hues really define this pattern. Of course, the purple is shown on the grapes and both are perfect for placing in your kitchen.

Both are in mint condition and the bowl measures 4 ¼ inches tall and 6 inches wide while the vase measures 8 ¼ inches in height and is 7 inches wide.

This is just a few of our new arrivals and as always, check in often – you never know what you’ll find.

If you haven’t checked into our new referral program, now is a great time to do so. We’ve partnered with Referral Candy to offer our customers a 5% discount when they refer their friends and those friends make a purchase.

Not only that, but their first purchase also means a nice $10 savings for them, too. It’s a win-win! Learn more here.

Roseville Falline

The Roseville Falline line is one of the smallest collections in Roseville Pottery, with just 16 roseville fallinepieces. Considered a middle period Art Deco line, it was introduced in 1933. Many collectors use the word “elegant” to describe this line – and rightfully so. Frank Ferrell was the primary designer and the Falline line (“Fay Leen”), is easily identified because of the pea pods that adorn the various pieces. They run vertically, each with handles on both sides. There were two color patterns, those with various browns and greens and the more popular blue/green/yellow combinations.

The Art of Roseville Falline

The artistic efforts, even though they were pea pods, are quite beautiful.

Many of the pieces are darker or of different colors the closer to the top you get. It adds a certain dimension and because it’s unlike most other art pottery pieces of that era, it’s likely one reason people describe it as elegant and sophisticated.

Sometimes artists attempt to present a simple effort. They want the color combinations or perhaps the quality of the product to shine through. It’s not known, of course, if this was Ferrell’s purpose, regardless, it quickly became – and remains so today – one of the most loved Roseville Pottery lines.

Middle Period

Remember, this line was introduced in 1933, the same year Baneda, with its stunning shapes and hues, Blackberry, known for the nature motif of leaves and berries and Primrose, the lighter more feminine offering of the day, made their debuts. These middle period collections reveal the best of Roseville Pottery and its artists.

With just 16 items in this collection, mostly bowls, candlesticks and pitchers of varying sizes, it’s one of those highly sought after patterns.

If you collect Falline, you likely know how rare it is to find. It’s an art pottery collector’s dream.

American Art Pottery Beyond Ohio

For many art pottery collectors, Ohio is the place to go when they’re looking to learn more or expand their Roseville Pottery or Rookwood Pottery collections, but that’s not to say other regions of the country don’t have a lot to offer collectors. When you think of the south, odds are, it’s George Ohr, also known as the Mad Pottery of Biloxi and of course, the renowned Newcomb Pottery out of New Orleans, that come to mind.

But what do you associate with art pottery makers west of the Mississippi and specifically, Colorado? Van Briggle Pottery is one of those timeless names, forever associated with the best in American art pottery, but this wasn’t the only company in Colorado. In fact, Denver China and Pottery opened its doors within a few weeks of Van Briggle’s opening. What’s so interesting is the influence this company had within the art pottery community. So influential was Denver China and Pottery, the decision makers with Weller Pottery had considered relocating to the area after seeing the beautiful creations coming out of Denver China and Pottery.

William A. Long, who founded the highly respected (both then and now) Lonhuda Pottery, also founded Denver China and Pottery in 1901. If it was regional authenticity he was aiming for, he succeeded. He was committed to using materials, including clay, found only in Colorado.

capture-20140626-084507

Denver China & Pottery markings

There were two especially notable glazes used in the company’s wares. At that time, Grueby had seen great success with the matte green glaze it had perfected. Proof of that success and timeless quality is found in modern day. Odds are, you have something in your own collection that incorporates that rich green glaze. Once people realized that not only was Denver China and Pottery a force to be reckoned with, but that it was also giving them what they wanted, the company’s success soared. The matte glazing efforts were paying off.

There was one more glaze technique used by Denver China and Pottery. It was luminous, elegant and even suggested a fragility not seen in other pottery collections. The iridescent glaze was incorporated with great success and because of that, it remains popular within the pottery community.

If you’re not familiar with this line of American art pottery, the story is fascinating. Some of the works are on display at The Smithsonian National Museum. Also, if you live in or will be traveling through Colorado, be sure to explore “Colorado Kilns,” an exhibit running through October 1 at the Colorado History Museum. This is an annual conference, so if you’re unable to attend this year, it would make a great vacation for next year.

As always, we’d love to see photos of any Denver China and Pottery pieces you may own.

What Sets Roseville Earlam Apart

For avid Roseville Pottery collectors, it’s near impossible to discuss the logistics behind the beauty in the Earlam line without mentioning Frank Ferrell. He was, after all, the creative force behind many Roseville lines – including Earlam. Part of our ongoing appreciation for this particular line isn’t so much what it offers, but rather, what it doesn’t offer.

Unlike many – if not most – of Roseville’s patterns, Ferrell opted to not include florals or the geometric shapes that were trendy at the time. Instead, you’ll find softer lines, plenty of curves and bulbous centers. Many of the pots and vases also had tell-tale handles on either side that collectors are always searching for, even today.  The Earlam shapes are limited, especially when compared to some of the other Roseville pottery lines. It has just 22 shapes and most are vases, bowls and pots. While there are none with floral decorative elements, there are a few strawberry and crocus pots, which add further distinction.

For those who appreciate the more muted glazes, Earlam is for you. The efforts made to ensure each piece was unlike any other, in sort of an “imperfectly perfect” way, were subtle. The rims also offer an interesting dimension as most are ridged with a slightly darker tan or brown. There’s something really special about this important Roseville pattern.

The green shading, with its matte finish, coupled with the soft yellow that transitions to deeper yellow-gold colors play off of the other for a truly visual appeal that brings artistry to new levels. Keep in mind -though these were the two primary hues, you can find Roseville Earlam with shades of blue and brown.  Ferrell knew he was on to something and fortunately for us, there remains a decent amount of Earlam pieces that can be found today – though it’s unlikely anyone who has any part of this collection would ever dream of parting ways with it.

Aside from occasional bevel, or “ridging” efforts, this collection is beautiful because of the simplicity. It’s allowed to be appreciated for those two primary colors – green and yellow – and, of course, the abundance of space in the bowls and vases. Why Ferrell opted to forego the “tried and true” decorative path is not known, but the Roseville Earlam line stands on its own and remains in big demand.

The Fascination of Roseville Pottery Cosmos Pattern

In 1940, the film Rebecca, which starred Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine, became an unexpected success. It’s likely because it revealed the darker side of the human condition. There’s one scene in particular where Fontaine’s character, the very young and new wife of Olivier’s Maxim de Winter, has come to live in Manderley, the massive mansion where the first Mrs. De Winter dies. Intimidated by the housekeeper, the bride accidently knocks off the table and breaks a beautiful pottery sculpture. For years, in my mind, the housekeeper became enraged because it’s a Roseville Pottery Cosmos pattern that was destroyed. Of course, there’s no reason to really believe that, it’s just that 1940 was also the year this exceptional Roseville

Roseville Pottery Cosmos

Roseville Pottery Cosmos

pattern was released. No doubt, 1940 was the year for spectacular artistic efforts, whether in film or American art pottery.

Roseville Cosmos offers three base colors, blue, brown and green. While many are drawn to those green hues, blue seems to be the color of choice and has been for many years. It could be the matte appearance or the way the pale flowers look against the blue. For those lucky enough to have a collection that includes all three standard colors, you know well the commanding presence of this particular Roseville pottery line. There’s also a slight bit of mystery associated with Cosmos: nailing down the actual number of shapes can be a challenge. There are some vintage advertisements that make mention of 48 shapes; however, if you plunder the Roseville factory pages, you’ll find 45.

What makes Cosmos so special are the notched elements often found around the rims. They provide an unexpected dimension which shows beautifully when on display. In fact, if you’re just now discovering Cosmos, don’t underestimate the importance of a neutral background. It highlights those notches, as evidenced in this image of a tan pitcher. As a fan of raised decorative elements, there are plenty in this collection. You can see the efforts made by the artists and as far as many are concerned, these are the details that really separate the masterful artists from the novice.

This really is a great line, especially if it’s a versatile collection of shapes you’re looking for. The wall pockets and window boxes seem to always be in demand, but it really comes as no surprise to anyone who adores the Roseville Pottery Cosmos pattern. Don’t forget to check out the Just Art Pottery Pinterest page, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter, too.

 

Roseville Raymor

It’s always fascinating to learn about a company’s inner-workings, and especially if an otherwise successful company hits a speed bump. It tells much about the heart of the company: the one who’s making the decisions in order to get it over the speed bump. Roseville Pottery is no different.

During one of those proverbial “speed bumps” in the early 1950s, Roseville Pottery made the decision to introduce a new line to

Roseville Raymor

sort of spruce things up. Instead of sticking with the tried and true combinations of years earlier (something most savvy business owners would do), the decision makers instead elected to introduce a couple of new lines. Enter Roseville Raymor and its young and slightly less traditional artist, Ben Seibel. His efforts included a more expensive glaze, an entirely different manner in which each piece was “power pressed” and more than a few setbacks, especially when it came to expensive repairs to the kiln. In fact, some accounts show that up to 25% of the production efforts during these days were lost because of the mechanical problems.

Still, Seibel remained determined and consistent. He had an image in his mind of how this particular line of pottery would fill a much needed space within Roseville Pottery.  It was all about a contemporary flair. In fact, for me, it’s easier to picture the various artistic efforts from this period into how they would fit into those amazing stages of homes that were so popular on television during that time. The high gloss, the slight tip to abstract and the deep vessels were something you might would find on an old episode of Betwitched or maybe I Dream of Jeanie – right during that television transition from black and white to color. The vibrancy of the blues and greens and even pinks – they’re all remarkable and used in all their glory on these sets. If he felt the heat from the cost of producing Roseville Raymor, it’s a shame because it’s one of the more decorative patterns within the entire Roseville Pottery collection.

Southern Influences on American Art Pottery

Most people equate American art pottery with those names from Ohio – Roseville Pottery, Rookwood Pottery, Weller, Owens, Zanesville Stoneware and even McCoy. When you think of southern influences, it’s likely the first, and perhaps only, pottery maker that comes to mind is Newcomb Pottery, created at Newcomb College in New Orleans. But there’s far more to be loved and appreciated from artists of the south. Some say you can smell the salt air in each piece as much of it was made along the Gulf Coast, including both Newcomb Pottery and, of course, those incredible, though eclectic, creations that bore George Ohr’s mark.

Nashville Art Pottery created an avenue or stage for students in the Nashville School of Art. Headed by Bettie J. Scovel, who’d

Newcomb Pottery (courtesy of Getty Images)

Newcomb Pottery (courtesy of Getty Images)

been trained by some of the best of the best Rookwood artists, she returned to her Nashville roots in order to share her love of clay and the magic that comes when an artist’s hands shape the clay into something spectacular. It was the late 1880s and upon her return, she quickly secured what was then known as the McGavock building and set out to bring the artists alive inside her students. Before the decade was up, there would be two lines of Nashville Art Pottery released, including Goldstone and Pomegranate. Both were high fired wares, though Goldstone was notably darker with rich browns and deep red hues while its counterpart, Pomegranate, included lighter colors, including a typical white base with pink and blue elements. Unfortunately, Nashville Pottery didn’t become as well-known as those in Ohio, but the fruits of hers and her students’ hard work can be found in Trumbull Prime Collection of The Art Museum at Princeton University.

Around this same time, George Ohr, the famous Biloxi, Mississippi artist, and Joseph Meyer (yes, that Joseph Meyer) decided to fill a void left by the bankrupt Louisiana Porcelain Works in New Orleans. They created New Orleans Art Pottery. The building they chose was an impressive three stories. Soon, the two artists secured the necessary kiln and began producing, for a very brief time, their version of porcelain ware. Unfortunately, there wasn’t room enough for New Orleans Pottery and the exciting new Newcomb Pottery, so its contribution was quite limited. Before long, Meyer would find his way to Newcomb Pottery, where he left his life’s work for many future generations to admire.

From Ohr to Meyer to Scovel – and many more, the south was the birthplace for beautiful American art pottery designs.

A Closer Look at Roseville Earlam

Many collectors of Roseville pottery will hone in on one particular design element and for those who treasure the Roseville Earlam line, that specific element is the simple arts and crafts forms and the quality matte glazes. The subtle colors provide the perfect canvas for light to produce exceptional dimensions; indeed, it looks as though it’s been masterfully shadowed. With just 22 various Earlam shapes, it’s a natural assumption that the artists would have been assertive in their efforts of ensuring it stands out. The most obvious way to accomplish that is via the inclusion of irregular asymmetric efforts or even geometric efforts, similar to what we see in the Roseville Futura lines. That’s not the case, though.

The extent of many of the pieces in this line are little more than open neck or slightly expanded bottom. There’s an absence of

Roseville Pottery Earlam Blue Green Handled Vase

floral motifs, animals, people or anything else, for that matter. Some offer handles, but almost always they’re placed near the top of the vase or pots. That’s the beauty of it: simple and clean served the purposes nicely.

The Earlam line also offers several console bowls and strawberry pots – with one even offering a saucer. With the exception of the occasional candlestick pairs and umbrella stands, the majority of the shapes are vases and bowls. The one unlikely – though beautiful – inclusion is the hanging basket. It comes as no surprise to learn it’s always in high demand.

The green matte against that pale yellow glaze really bodes well with this line, which was introduced in 1930. There’s one important consideration – most pieces from this line had paper labels, and like any other line that had the stickers, when they fall off or are otherwise removed, many assume it’s not authentic. There are some with handwritten markings, but it’s impossible to identify which shapes the writing is more likely to be found.

What’s not at all surprising is the Frank Ferrell influence; remember, he tended to steer clear of the more feminine elements, such as flowers, and preferred a more streamlined presentation. Still, whatever his reasons were, his ability to transform those artistic images in his mind to the potter’s will is exactly what makes this line of Roseville pottery so spectacular.

The Vast Roseville Futura Art Deco Line

What’s not to love about what is arguably the most versatile Roseville Pottery pattern.  Roseville Futura is all about the art deco style, complete with sharp lines, dimension and extraordinary color choices. Considered a middle period line, Futura was introduced in 1928 and really put Roseville  in a new light.

Remember, both Roseville Carnelian and Roseville Rosecraft were introduced just two years earlier. While both of these arts and crafts patterns have their own draw and remain popular with collectors today, they also seemed to set the stage for what was coming. Rosecraft’s primary colors were brown and green and had only 10 shapes. Meanwhile, Carnelian didn’t sell well and the majority of any unsold pieces were pulled and re-glazed as the Carnelian II pattern.

And then the curtain was raised for Roseville Futura

Roseville Pottery Futura Spittoon Vase 403-7

. Think of a color – any color – Futura offers it. No “one-hue color” with this line, you’re bound to find those deeper greens that are stunning under a heavy gloss, those moss greens that are ideal for detailing and it’s the same with all of the colors.

There are 78 Futura shapes and most are marked with paper labels (don’t forget, those paper labels are likely to have been lost through the years, which means many would be unmarked) with a few that offer hand written shape numbers.

Futura made impressive strides in its heyday and the potential was there for a long run, but like all things in the late 1920s, what “was before” rarely “was after” the stock market crash. Futura was dealt an unfair fate. Even after some recovery, the mindsets of people were raw with all too vivid memories of poverty, hunger and fear. The collective priority of a nation shifted. For many collectors who own any Futura pieces, there’s a certain realization. These pieces were likely made by artists who were confident in the future and purchased by consumers who weren’t yet worried about the possibility of what lied ahead. Regardless of the motivation for collectors, there’s such beauty and detailing to every piece from the Roseville Futura Line.

Here’s a list of all Roseville Futura pieces:

Bowl   

187-8 tan            Balloons Bowl

187-8 gray         Balloons Bowl

188-8 tan            Aztec Bowl

188-8 gray         Aztec Bowl

189-4                   Sand Toy

190-3                   Blue Box

191-8                    Square Box

194-5                   Little Flying Saucer or “Ashtray”

195-10                 Flying Saucer

196-12 tan          Sailboat

196 12 gray        Sailboat

197-6                    Half Egg

198-5                    Hibachi

Candle Holder, pr     

1072-4                Aztec Ladies

1073-4                Candlesticks with Leaves

1075-4                Flying Saucer Candlesticks

Flower Frog   

15-2.5                  Little Round Frog

15-3.5                  Big Round Frog

Hanging Basket         

344-5 tan           Little Hanging Basket

344-5 gray        Little Hanging Basket

344-6 tan           Big Hanging Basket

344-6 gray        Big Hanging Basket

Jardiniere      

616-6 tan            Jardiniere

616-6 gray         Jardiniere

616-7 tan            Jardiniere

616-7 gray         Jardiniere

616-8 tan            Jardiniere

616-8 gray         Jardiniere

616-9 tan            Jardiniere

616-10 tan         Jardiniere

616-10 gray      Jardiniere & Pedestal

Planter           

81-5                      Blue Sunray

82-6                      Blue Fan

85-4                      2 Pole Pink Pillow Vase

Vase   

Roseville Pottery Futura Space Capsule Vase 432-10

380-6                   Torch

381-6                    Beer Mug

382-7                    Telescope

383-8                    Little Blue Triangle

384-8                    Ball Bottle

385-8                    Pleated Star

386-8 pink          Jukebox

386-8 brns          Jukebox

387-7 gray          Bamboo Leaf Ball

387-7 blue          Bamboo Leaf Ball

388-9                    Big Blue Triangle

389-9                    Emerald Urn

390-10 org Bud Christmas Tree

390-10 blu Bud Christmas Tree

391-10                  Black Flame

392-10                  Shooting Star

393-12                  Four Ball Vase

394-12                  Bomb

395-10                  Stepped Urn

396-5                     Chalice

Roseville Pottery Futura Four Ball Vase 393-12

397-6                     Square Cone

398-6                     Green Twist

399-7                     Red Vee

400-7 tan            Ostrich Egg

400-7 p&g          Ostrich Egg

401-8                    Cone

402-8                    Milk Carton

403-7                    Spittoon

404-8 blue          Balloons Globe

404-8 grn            Balloons Globe

405-7                    Spaceship

406-8                    Beehive

407-9                    Green Fan

408-10                 Seagull

409-9                    Football Urn

410-12                  Table Leg

411-14                  Arches

412-9                    Tank

421-5                    Brown Stump

422-6                    Two Pole Bud Vase

423-6                    Tombstone

424-7                    Stepped Egg

425-8                    Hexagon Twist

426-8                    Winged Vase

427-8                    Mauve Thistle

428-8                    Egg with Leaves

429-9                    Purple Crocus

430-9                    Chinese Pillow

431-10                  Falling Bullet

432-10                  Space Capsule

433-10                  Pine Cone

434-10                  Michelin Man

435-10                  Elephant Leg

436-12                  Chinese Bronze

437-12                  Weeping Tulip

438-15                  Tall Teasel

Wall Pocket   

1261-8 tan           Wall Pocket

1261-8 gra           Wall Pocket

Window Box 

376-15                  Window Box

Hungarian Zsolnay Ceramics

Ask any Zsolnay Ceramics collector to describe this European line of art pottery in just one word, and you’ll surely hear capture-20140405-061117“iridescent”. Initially, this Hungarian family set out to create stoneware that was functional and utilitarian. A decade after being founded in 1853, Vilmos Zsolnay entered the family business and learned how his father’s business worked. Over the course of another decade, Vilmos brought the company to heights his father had never dreamed possible. World fairs and international exhibitions followed and so did the awards. Eosin porcelain became the dominant material and as the company grew, so did the Zsolnay family. Julia Zsolnay, Vilmos’s sister, married and her husband soon joined the business.

Even though the family artists had their own distinctions, there’s no denying the seamless look and feel. The pottery, as mentioned, was mostly iridescent in appearance and many of their creations can still be seen in various landmarks and buildings throughout Hungary.

The iridescence is due to a process called “eosin” and it’s a hallmark for many artistic efforts during this time period (at the turn of the century). The eosin works as a glaze and gives it a certain metallic look, but the magic is found in the different colors that are anything but static. Adjust the piece slightly and what was purple becomes red. It’s a lovely presentation and as collectors can attest to, highly sought after.

The Zsolnay Hungarian art pottery centerpiece, shown above, has the eosin glaze and depicts a woman trying to capture fish. It’s a larger piece and is in mint condition. It measures an impressive 11 inches in height and measures 14 inches wide. It’s a beautiful effort that’s quite detailed. This is just one of the Zsolnay Pottery offerings that are available right now. Be sure to explore our complete inventory.

Like many companies, the various wars took their tolls on the company and the Budapest location was bombed. For a while, before being sold, the family tried to re-introduce durable and useable stoneware, but by then, there was just no turning back. The company was sold. In recent years, the family has begun to rebuild the Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacture. Two years ago, it partnered with IKEA. While it may never revert to the true European art pottery company, what we’re left with is an impressive body of work that’s highly sought after and deeply respected around the world.